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Onions

October 27, 2015

Raw onion may give you questionable breath, but I've noticed that people who eat them tend to be in excellent health. This doesn't surprise me given the symphony of nutrition present in the humble onion. I doubt I can do it justice in one short post but here goes: 

Onions have antibiotic (even against MRSA; that hideous antibiotic resistant hospital bug), antiseptic and antimicrobial properties. They are rich in sulphur (plays a key role in liver function - vital!), potassium (essential for your heart beat), B vitamins (energy metabolism) and vitamin C (sorry oranges, but you don't deserve the vitamin C monopoly). 

Onions are rich in phytonutrients (plant based substances which appear to be protective to human health). Two such phytonutrients are called allicin and quercetin - both of whom help to reduce inflammation in the body. Remember - if disease is a tree, inflammation is the roots. 

Not only that, allicin has been shown to help reduce atherosclerosis (fat deposits in arteries which lead to heart attacks and stroke), lower blood pressure and normalise lipoprotein balance (cholesterol, triglycerides) - all of which lead to the number one killer in Western countries: heart disease. 

Onions are beyond yummy, so very good for you and so easy to find. Don't be a fashion victim when it comes to nutrition - paying endless pounds for the latest 'superfood' on the market is all well and good, but don't forget about the superfoods on our doorstep. Eat raw onion daily and you'll probably put me out of business .

Note: Cures for onion breath (if it matters to you): Chew a large handful of fresh parsley (also really good for you). 

"Banish (the onion) from the kitchen and the pleasure flies with it. Its presence lends color and enchantment to the most modest dish; its absence reduces the rarest delicacy to hopeless insipidity, and dinner to despair."
Elizabeth Robbins Pennell
American columnist

 

 

 

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